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Sow The Seed follows the ups and downs of me, Helen and my husband, Simon - a couple trying to live a simpler life in south-west Wales.

I hope this blog will not only be a good reference and diary for us over the coming years, but will give helpful advice and tips for people trying to do the same thing, or dreaming of doing the same thing.

Find out more on how we got here.

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Tasks: Sowing; pruning; weeding; pottering

Harvesting: Cucumber, lettuce, radishes, strawberries, broad beans, potatoes

Eggs this year: 394 (hens) 317 (ducks)

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Posts Tagged ‘ash dieback’

Diamond leision on trunk of ash tree

Diamond lesion on trunk of ash tree

I can’t believe I haven’t written anything on Sow The Seed since July. It’s now  the beginning of December, and summer is a distant memory. And unfortunately my first post in 5 months brings bad news…we’ve identified Ash Dieback on our plot. Some of our ash trees, which we planted during our first few winters here, have been growing well. However, this summer some of them didn’t look quite right, and when I went to look at them in the week, I saw the classic symptom of a diamond shaped lesion on the trunk of one of the trees. I didn’t see this on any others, but I’m sure if one of them has got it, then the rest will follow suit in due course. The saplings were all ones we had found growing nearby, and not from a tree nursery, so the disease must have come in on the wind, and will transfer from tree to tree this way as well. This is a bit of a disaster, not only are many of the trees we planted going to die, but much of our hedgerows are ash, so if these succumb to the disease, then the hedges are going to be very bare. I’ve read that some ash trees appear to be immune from getting Ash Dieback, so fingers crossed this may be the case with some of ours. Also, mature trees, of which we’ve got two in our garden, may also be better at withstanding the disease. We will just have to wait and see what happens.

All the advice says it is best to remove and destroy any small trees, to at least slowdown any transmittance to other trees, so we have cut down and burnt the tree, as well as a few others that looked a bit suspect. I will also report it, but I can see from the Forestry Commission website, that Ash Dieback has already been reported in our area, so this is not strictly necessary, but it might help to identify how quickly the disease is spreading.

We will now have to decide whether it is worth planting anything in place of the ash, or use this as a way to thin the trees, which would have needed doing at some point anyway.

So not great news to end the year on, but inevitable.

Section through trunk with leision

Section through trunk with lesion

Modified version of the Summer Polaroid Pics template