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Welcome

Sow The Seed follows the ups and downs of me, Helen and my husband, Simon - a couple trying to live a simpler life in south-west Wales.

I hope this blog will not only be a good reference and diary for us over the coming years, but will give helpful advice and tips for people trying to do the same thing, or dreaming of doing the same thing.

Find out more on how we got here.

What’s Happening Today

Tasks: Sowing; pruning; weeding; pottering

Harvesting: Cucumber, lettuce, radishes, strawberries, broad beans, potatoes

Eggs this year: 394 (hens) 317 (ducks)

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Posts Tagged ‘Camera trap’

Hen Pheasant caught on camera

We hope we’ve made our garden and grounds more wildlife friendly since we moved in, and given the amount and variety of birds we see, we think we have. And while we can see the birds and sometimes other wildlife in the garden, we haven’t seen much wildlife in the rest of the grounds…but we know it’s there as we see the evidence. Tracks criss-crossing the fields, large holes appear overnight, badger latrines and activity all over the place, and various “deposits” left around the place for me to find when I’m gardening!

I’ve been wanting to get a camera trap (sometimes called trail camera) for a while, which would help solve what is responsible for some of these mysteries. And for my birthday my wish was granted. Simon did lots of research on the various types of cameras available, and with a little help from a company called NatureSpy I received a Bushnell Essential E2 Trophy Cam. It takes both video and still photos, and can take pictures during the day and night. It’s a relatively simple device, relying on movement to trigger the camera into action, which takes either a series of still photos or a short video of whatever is in its field of view. The camera comes with a strap, which enables you to secure the camera against a tree, however, given there aren’t always trees available where you want to site the camera, I invested in a camera pole, which means you can place the camera wherever you want and at different heights.

My first attempts weren’t very successful, perhaps due to where it was positioned, but the camera is now down in our bottom field, not far from our pond, where we think there is wildlife activity. And we weren’t wrong as we’ve managed to capture a number of visitors – a local cat (which solves the mystery deposits left in our heather bushes), a hen pheasant (which is now a regular in the garden), and a fox (which is a little worrying given we keep chickens and ducks). I’m hoping once the badgers and their young become more active, we’ll get some good footage.

 

Modified version of the Summer Polaroid Pics template