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Welcome

Sow The Seed follows the ups and downs of me, Helen and my husband, Simon - a couple trying to live a simpler life in south-west Wales.

I hope this blog will not only be a good reference and diary for us over the coming years, but will give helpful advice and tips for people trying to do the same thing, or dreaming of doing the same thing.

Find out more on how we got here.

What’s Happening Today

Tasks: Sowing; pruning; weeding; pottering

Harvesting: Cucumber, lettuce, radishes, strawberries, broad beans, potatoes

Eggs this year: 394 (hens) 317 (ducks)

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Posts Tagged ‘hens’

I can’t believe the last post I wrote on Sow The Seed was about how hot and dry it was in west Wales. Since then we’ve had to contend with torrential rain and winds bought by the likes of Storm Callum. The weather is now beginning to turn wintery with cold nights and frosty mornings, but some beautiful sunny days; hopefully a taste of the winter to come!

Old and new girls – Mavis and Edna

I also wrote back in July that we had lost the first of our rescue hens, and recently we lost the last two – we were never sure how old they were, so we can only assume they had come to the end of their natural lives. We also lost one of our Speckledy hens, so we were down to only one chicken. Luckily this only lasted a few days as we had already decided to get a couple of new girls from a local breeder. The new hens are Rhode Rocks and are said to be hardy and good egg layers. We’ve named them Mavis and Edna (those familiar with children’s cartoon Willo the Wisp will know the characters). In the meantime, our old hen has now decided to go into moult (just in time for the cold snap), and is looking very bedraggled and sorry for herself; nevertheless she continues to exert her authority and keep the new girls in their place, and Mavis has come into lay so we aren’t without eggs.

Goats keeping a watchful eye!

The goats are back in their winter field, enjoying the hedgerow and any grass that is still growing. We’ve also been giving them some of our windfall apples (in small doses) as even after storing and juicing as much as we can, we have plenty to spare.

The ducks, taking it easy for winter!

The ducks are now free-loading for the rest of the winter (we haven’t had an egg from them since September), but to be fair they are now old girls; one of them is over five years old.

I’m slowly putting the garden to bed for the winter, clearing out the polytunnel and covering all the beds with manure and compost for the worms to work in. It’s been quite a good growing year, helped by installing the rabbit-proof fence, and the dry spell meant that the slugs weren’t as bad as previous years. We’re now slowly eating our way through the huge amounts of squashes and sweet potatoes that grew so well in the hot weather, and enjoying the last few tomatoes and cucumbers before the winter veg gets into full swing.

 

Modified version of the Summer Polaroid Pics template